Farmtotable

Eggs-cellence in the Field

While food trends come and go, announcing this berry or that herb as the new star ingredient to your every meal, there’s no denying the simple egg. There are as many ways to prepare an egg by itself as there are recipes to which eggs are essential, whether it’s dyed and hidden in grass, placed on a Seder plate, or part of a spring-inspired baking project with seasonal fruit on the horizon. But with so many different labels and terms on egg cartons these days, what does it take for an egg to make it to our discerning shelves?

There are plenty of producers that can legally slap the words “free range” or “cage free” on their egg cartons, but neither of those terms are guarantees that their hens are living the idyllic lives we hope they are, nor are they promises against some of the industry’s crueler practices. That’s why we’re proud to offer eggs from Oliver’s Organic Eggs and Red Gate Grocer’s Scenic Vista Farm, both family-owned farms in upstate NY. On these farms, hens have access to spacious pastures, free to graze on provided vegetarian feed and field insects. Oliver’s, which hand-raises their hens from chicks, is certified organic, which extends to the grains they grow themselves that becomes feed for their chickens. On Scenic Vista Farm, chickens roam free all year long, and each egg supplied to Red Gate Grocer is certified American humane.

True free range farming like this, which gives chickens freedom to be chickensinstead of screened-in rooms that barely qualify as “outdoor access”also produces healthier eggs. Pastured eggs have lower cholesterol and saturated fats than their conventional counterparts, as well as up to double essential vitamins like A and E, and up to seven times as much beta carotene. You could say pastured eggs really help us reach our beak potential! – Order delivery! These eggs-ceptional eggs are available here!

Carla Bueno-SandersEggs-cellence in the Field
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A Gift That Meats Expectations!

The New Whole Animal Card From Our Butchers!

Give the omnivore in your life a crash course on whole animal butchery! Our new Whole Animal Card invites you to delve through each layer of a steer or pig, selecting one cut from each section of the animal. This gift card is the perfect stocking stuffer for the meat lovers in your life. Help them branch out from their usual chops and maybe learn a thing of two from our Whole Animal Butcher in the process!

What is Whole Animal Butchery?

From nose to toes, our butchers break down whole animals, doing their best to eliminate waste along the way. This approach offers many benefits, the most important of which is sustainability. Farmers don’t just raise pork chops and brisket, they raise whole pigs and steers. Using the entire animal creates less food waste and helps us build a more sustainable food system overall. Additionally, ordering a whole entire animal directly from a farm provides a more transparent supply chain: we know exactly where the meat is coming from. We choose the farms we work with based on quality, humane handling practices, and commitment to sustainable land use. We can guarantee that each animal we break down lives up to these standards. Not least of all, whole animal butchery offers a great deal of variety! Our Whole Animal Card is a passport to exploring each subprimal layer of a steer or pig. For pork, you can try one cut each of the shoulder, loin, belly, and ham. Our steer card includes one cut of chuck, brisket & shank, plate, rib, short loin, sirloin, and round.

Delicious from top to bottom, these steers and pigs are pasture-raised and ready to show you the range and importance of local, grass-fed whole animal butcher. At $100 – $150 per card, this gift is a great value that won’t steer you wrong! These are available for purchase in-store, and you can buy them online!

Mike FunkA Gift That Meats Expectations!
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Thanksgiving Holiday Hours

Getting Your Turkeys in a Row

The holidays are our favorite time of year at the Greene Grape. We love playing a part in all of our customers’ celebrations, and doing what we do best: food. As you’re getting your ducks (and turkeys, chickens, etc.) in a row for Thanksgiving, please keep in mind our revised hours for the holiday:

Thanksgiving, Thursday 11/23

Annex: 8AM – 1PM
Provisions: 8AM-2PM
Scoops & Sweets: CLOSED
Wine & Spirits: 10AM – 3PM

Whether you’re a seasoned chef or a first time turkey roaster, you may find yourself overwhelmed when planning your holiday menu. We’ll be open until the early afternoon on Thursday to help you cover any last minute bases. We’ll have pies, sides, and that one stick of butter or onion even the best of us can forget. If you find yourself struggling with any more questions, like “How do I select wines for my meal?” or “How do I even cook this turkey?”, our FAQ page can help you out! We hope you have a very happy holiday, Fort Greene!

Mike FunkThanksgiving Holiday Hours
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Greene Plate Dinner Special

Got a lot on your plate?
Take dinner off of your to-do list

The city that never sleeps often doesn’t have time to make dinner. We love a home cooked meal, but we understand the need for dinner on-the-go. Which is why our Greene Plate Special is designed to be convenient without sacrificing quality. Each week, we prepare a different meal made to save your time without compromising nutrition and quality. Unlike your average takeout dinner, there’s no mystery to our ingredient sourcing. These meals are an artful collaboration between different departments of our store. We take grass-fed, locally sourced meats from our Butcher Counter and farm-fresh seasonal produce and combine them with the talent of our Fort Greene Kitchen masters. This brings you the freshest and easiest dinner possible!

In addition to peace of mind, our Greene Plate special is always deliciously creative. You’ll find inventive, restaurant quality meals like Honey Mustard Glazed Salmon with fragrant jasmine rice, summer vegetable stir fry, and crispy shallot, or this week’s special, Roasted Goffle Road Farms Chicken with garlic and fall herb marinade accompanied by farro and fall vegetable pilaf, sauteed green beans with toasted almonds, and preserved lemon vinaigrette. A seasonal summer special featured Black Bean Croquetas with corn, sweet potato and chilis, accompanied by summer vegetable hash, hardy greens, toasted pepitas, cotija, and salsa verde. That’s just three examples of many more to come!

This special is available every week at your fingertips in our chilled grab n’ go case, which is perfect for picking up after work and enjoying in the comfort of your own dining room. We also serve the Greene Plate hot and ready to go from 5pm-8pm every night. See our Prepared Foods page or follow us on Instagram to see what each week’s special is!

Mike FunkGreene Plate Dinner Special
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More Than A-peeling: Locally Harvested Apples

A walk through our produce section makes two things clear: fall is here, and so are apples! In addition to classics like Gala and McIntosh, we have many varieties you might not see in a typical grocery store. Our Produce Department works directly with ecologically-minded local farms like Champlain Orchards and Scott Farms in Vermont, and Lancaster Farm Fresh Cooperative in Pennsylvania. These farms grow a variety of apple species that support the local ecology by promoting biodiversity. While we recommend trying them all out, we thought we’d provide a little context to inform your choices in cooking and snacking.

Applications for Apples

If you’re looking for the perfect baking apples, we have a number of great options. Yellow with a pink blush, Honeycrisp apples live up to their title in both texture and sweetness. They work well baked into pies, crumbles, and other desserts. Their crisp texture also makes them ideal raw in salads and coleslaw.

For a great raw apple snack, the gala apple really shines. One of the sweetest apples, Galas pack some of the best nutritional value, containing vitamins A, C, and B in and pectin. Eat them raw or add them diced up to salads, salsas, and chutneys. Similar to Galas, we also carry the Sansa apple. Sansas are a Japanese species that are complexly sweet and mildly tart. They contain important nutrients like potassium and dietary fiber, and are a perfect snacking apple eaten fresh and raw.

Juicy and lightly tart, Paula Reds are a dusty red apple with gold spots. They break down quickly and easily, and are ideal for applesauce and apple butter. Similarly, McIntosh apples have a delicate flesh and spicy flavor that makes them ideal for cider and applesauce.

Mike FunkMore Than A-peeling: Locally Harvested Apples
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Eat Your Vegetables, Fort Greene!

By Produce Buyer, Nailah Griffin
Culturally, my gastronomic upbringing was in Caribbean and Southern fare, both of which can be very meat-centric cuisines. However, when I was about 10 years old, my mom decided to become a veggie-focused pescatrian, totally shifting the eating habits of our household. As a result, we learned newer, better ways to eat our favorite dishes sans meat. In honor of “Eat Your Vegetables” Day, and parents everywhere struggling to get their kids to eat veggies, I present a few of my childhood favorites!


Red Cabbage Coleslaw with Green Apples
1 ½ cup of shredded purple cabbage
1 large crisp green apple, thinly sliced
1 medium carrot, grated
½ medium red onion, diced
¼ cup mayo
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
½ lemon
2 tsp honey
Salt/Pepper to taste

In a bowl, mix mayo, apple cider vinegar, honey, salt and pepper, and squeeze the lemon halve. Whisk until smooth. In another bowl, combine all the cabbage, apple, carrot, and onion. Pour sauce over the veggies and toss until evenly coated. Enjoy.


Bajan Style Rice
2 cups rice
6 cups water
1 vegetable bouillon cube
1 tbsp thyme
1 tbsp marjoram
1 tbsp chive, dried or freshly chopped
1 large tomato, diced
1 medium onion (or ½ large onion), diced

Boil the vegetable bouillon, diced onion, herbs, in 4 cups of water for about 15-20 minutes.
Then, add the rice, diced tomatoes and remaining water. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook until the water is absorbed and the rice is tender


5 Spice Tofu Stir Fry
1 package firm tofu, cubed
2 heads of broccoli, chopped
½ red pepper, diced
½ green pepper, diced
½ cup yellow onion, diced
2 cups of spinach
1 medium sized zucchini, diced
5 spice blend
Olive Oil, as desired

In a bowl, season diced firm tofu with 5 spice blend and set aside. In a skillet, heat about 2 tbsp of oil and, once hot, add the onions and peppers. Cook until onions are translucent, then add broccoli and cook for about 7 minutes. Next, stir in the zucchini and the tofu. Cook until all vegetables are bright but haven’t lost their crunch and then add in spinach. Lower the heat and cover the skillet, allowing it to sit for about 2-3 minutes. Remove top and stir until spinach is evenly dispersed.

Angela GelsoEat Your Vegetables, Fort Greene!
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Sofrito for the Season

Mixtures of stewed aromatic vegetables, herbs and spices are at the core of almost every type of cuisine. Sofrito is the Spanish version, usually consisting of peppers, onions and tomato. Luckily all of those veggies are in season right now and Provisions Produce Buyer, Jason Rivera, has put together a recipe for sofrito success. The idea behind this homestyle dish is to use whatever vegetables are available to create a flavorful, easy to eat, easy to digest meal.

(And remember, the word sofrito doesn’t have to limit your cooking. In the Fall you could just as easily be using fennel, carrots and onions instead of peppers, onions and tomatoes.)

Ingredients
Extra virgin olive oil (preferably really tasty stuff)
A few sweet peppers, diced (whatever looks pretty at the market)
A fat juicy onion, diced (look for fresh uncured onions at this time of year)
A ripe tomato diced (Brandywines work really well for this, I recommend a red tomato)
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 cups white wine
water or chicken stock
1/2 pound of green, yellow, purple or romano beans with the tough end trimmed
2 heirloom squash cut into 1/4 inch rounds (my favorite is the Romanesca)
1 ear corn cut from the cob
4 red radishes sliced into 1/4 inch rounds
10 fresh basil leaves
Salt and pepper to taste
Sherry vinegar to taste

1. Heat a pot, large enough to contain all of the ingredients. Add enough olive oil to generously coat the bottom of the pot. Throw the peppers and onions in there and cook them until they are soft without browning them. If it looks a little dry add more olive oil.
2. Add the tomatoes, bay leaf and white wine. Simmer this until all of the liquid evaporates.
3. At this point continue to cook the mixture until the oil separates out and the mixture starts to stick on the bottom. Be careful here, you don’t want burnt, just a little toasted. Stir very often.
4. Add the beans and cover with stock or water and simmer. It’s a good idea to take a wooden spoon and scrape all the tasty bits of the bottom of the pot.
5. Cook the beans until they are very soft and tender, and a lot of the liquid has evaporated. They will turn army green, and look overcooked, but they will also become sweet and soak up all of that sofrito liquid.
6. Stir in the squash, corn and radishes and remove from heat. At this point season with salt, pepper and vinegar.
7. This dish should be served just above room temperature with a piece of crusty bread to soak up the juices. Just before serving, stir in the basil leaves and a bit of fresh olive oil.

Enjoy!

Meg ChristmanSofrito for the Season
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The Mighty Burger

The Mighty Burger

The most quintessential item at any Fourth of July cookout, the burger is as classic as it gets, but not all burgers are made the same! Our whole animal butchers grind specific cuts of beef to create our All-Star line-up of burgers. Let us introduce you to the team!

Ribeye Cap: lean and satisfying
pair with: Wisconsin Sheep Dairy Co-op’s Blue Hills Bleu

Short Rib: extra juicy
pair with: Jasper Hills Clothbound Cheddar

La Ranchera: skirt steak burger with extra beefy flavor
pair with:a juicy pickle

Bacon Brisket: our most popular burger
enhance with:a sweet alpine cheese for extra melt factor!

Extra-Dry Aged Ribeye Cap: tender with highly concentrated flavor
pair with:
nothing

Meg ChristmanThe Mighty Burger
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Grill’s Night Out!

Can’t decide what to grill this weekend? Take a tip from our butchers! It doesn’t take much to bring out the incredible flavor of our grass-fed meats.
Beef: Dry Aged Rib-eye, Top Sirloin or NY Strip
Pork: Top Sirloin, T-Bone Chop
Sausage: Any kind!!
Pro-Tip: Use fresh soaked bundles of herbs in place of a basting brush, the slight abrasions they create increase the surface area for browning and impart light flavors throughout the meat.

Don’t forget the wine! While you’re grilling, open up a bottle of Chad Pinot Noir ’13 ($20), a tasty Cali pinot packed with lush, tart red fruits with underpinnings of fresh, mulchy earth.

Sourced from the Santa Rita Hills in Santa Barbara County, the wine is medium-bodied, versatile, and intense in flavor, allowing it to hold its own with whatever you’re throwing on the grill.

Happy grillin’ Fort Greene!

Greene GrapeGrill’s Night Out!
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